صلاة خوف | Prayer of Fear (by Mosireen)

Turn on subtitles for the poem by Mahmoud Ezzat. Beautiful, chilling. 

Cleopatra to Mark Antony: What I’ve got in store for you baby. Sheaves of golden wheat, honey and dates, a guitar pick made from my bone, the safest tomb.

tarrifiq:

Tree in Tahrir Square, 2012 (Mohamed Abou El Naga)

tarrifiq:

Tree in Tahrir Square, 2012 (Mohamed Abou El Naga)

thatonesuheirhammad:

rafah. out of egypt. s.khatib sept 2012.

thatonesuheirhammad:

rafah. out of egypt. s.khatib sept 2012.

proustitute:

Lee Miller, Egypt, 1937

proustitute:

Lee Miller, Egypt, 1937

claytoncubitt:

FEMALE WORKERS OF ALL LANDS BE BEAUTIFUL. (Egyptian Surrealism)
“Along these lines we see only the imprisonment of thought, whereas art is known to be an exchange of thought and emotions shared by all humanity, one that knows not these artificial boundaries.”

claytoncubitt:

FEMALE WORKERS OF ALL LANDS BE BEAUTIFUL. (Egyptian Surrealism)

Along these lines we see only the imprisonment of thought, whereas art is known to be an exchange of thought and emotions shared by all humanity, one that knows not these artificial boundaries.”

uprisingsintranslation:

Murals by artist and professor Alaa Awad on the wall outside of the American University in Cairo’s downtown campus on Mohammed Mahmoud Street. 

From “500 words” on artforum.com - Alaa Awad discusses the murals he designed in collaboration with artists Ammar Abu Bakr and Hanaa El Deighem on Mohammed Mahmoud Street (as told to Claire Davies): 

“I took a break from teaching and came to Tahrir Square earlier this month because of the February 1 massacre in Port Said that followed a football game. We started painting the mural that day. I have no plans to leave now, and so I keep working on it. The mural is a memorial to the shuhada [martyrs] who died in Port Said. The paints are cheap; we buy them with our own money. I painted the ancient Egyptian compositions, Ammar did the martyrs’ portraits, and Hanaa painted the decorative elements. It’s structured like a story: The work begins with scenes painted in an ancient Egyptian style of people bringing offerings to the ruler, who is depicted as a mouse. In the next scene we see the Mubarak family on trial for crimes against social equality and justice. Suzanne Mubarak is depicted with her suckling son, preparing him to take power. Then there’s a scene of a women’s march. It’s an image from the Ramesseum and dates to the time of Ramses II. The original is now mostly destroyed.

“We wanted to recognize the key role of the women whom we respect very much––like Madame Ghada Abdelkhalaq, Nawara Negm, and Alaa Mahfouz––in the struggle. Here you see women as the ancient Egyptians depicted them. They are climbing a ladder that symbolizes the revolution. They must break through where the ladder meets the sky. The women are nude; they are beautiful. They are not covering their bodies. We are Muslims but we don’t believe in the Wahhabi style of Islam that has been imported to Egypt. Egypt has a long, long history and its own traditions.

“The portraits of the martyrs are next. Here the women are mourning the deceased. They are carrying black flowers. There is the door of Osiris, which you pass through on your way to the land of the dead. At the funeral procession the women are wailing and smearing themselves with earth. This is a very old Egyptian tradition. The goddess of the sky, Nut, is rendered above, and the martyr’s soul is being welcomed into heaven with a lit candle.

“We just began work on another mural located on the same street. Ammar is painting portraits of those who died in the clashes on Mohamed Mahmoud Street and at Maspero last year. Many people come to look at them. Sometimes visitors write things on the mural or add small drawings or stencils. I don’t mind at all. The murals might disappear soon; we might find them covered up as soon as tomorrow. We’ll just paint them again.”

uprisingsintranslation:

Queen of girls 
(Roughly translated phrase, but the meaning comes across). This is a graffito of a female protester wearing a mask to protect against tear gas on Mohammed Mahmoud Street in downtown Cairo. 
Women have been pivotal participants and activists in protests and political activity since and before the uprising in Egypt began in January 2011. Here is great video report on the role of women in the anti-Supreme Council of Armed Forces protests in Tahrir Square from November 2010 by Bridgette Auger and Raphael Thelen. 

uprisingsintranslation:

Queen of girls

(Roughly translated phrase, but the meaning comes across). This is a graffito of a female protester wearing a mask to protect against tear gas on Mohammed Mahmoud Street in downtown Cairo. 

Women have been pivotal participants and activists in protests and political activity since and before the uprising in Egypt began in January 2011. Here is great video report on the role of women in the anti-Supreme Council of Armed Forces protests in Tahrir Square from November 2010 by Bridgette Auger and Raphael Thelen. 

Heartbreaking.
uprisingsintranslation:

Image I found online; a tribute to those who died last night at the Port Said stadium massacre. “UA” stands for Ultras Ahlawy, a group of football fans who support the Al-Ahly team. 
Over 70 people died and over 300 were wounded last night in clashes between rival supporters of the Al-Ahly and Al-Masry football teams. The unprecedented violence has sent a shock-wave throughout the country, causing many to blame security forces and the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) for a disconcerting lack of security in Egypt. While some Egyptians have blamed the violence on hooliganism and thuggery, others believe the event was planned to justify the SCAF’s maintenance of the Emergency Law in Egypt (the abolishment of which has been one of protesters’ main demands since the beginning of the uprising). 
“Activists, politicians see more than hooliganism in football violence,” one of several articles from the Egyptian Independent, Al-Masry Al-Youm’s English language edition that explains and describes reactions to the massacre. 

Heartbreaking.

uprisingsintranslation:

Image I found online; a tribute to those who died last night at the Port Said stadium massacre. “UA” stands for Ultras Ahlawy, a group of football fans who support the Al-Ahly team. 

Over 70 people died and over 300 were wounded last night in clashes between rival supporters of the Al-Ahly and Al-Masry football teams. The unprecedented violence has sent a shock-wave throughout the country, causing many to blame security forces and the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) for a disconcerting lack of security in Egypt. While some Egyptians have blamed the violence on hooliganism and thuggery, others believe the event was planned to justify the SCAF’s maintenance of the Emergency Law in Egypt (the abolishment of which has been one of protesters’ main demands since the beginning of the uprising). 

Activists, politicians see more than hooliganism in football violence,” one of several articles from the Egyptian Independent, Al-Masry Al-Youm’s English language edition that explains and describes reactions to the massacre. 

uprisingsintranslation:

Nothing is sweeter than honor
Famous quote from the Egyptian film “Hassan, I Love You” (1958), said by actor Tawfik al Daqn (who is pictured here). This particular graffito is on Owli Street in downtown Cairo; the same graffito is on a wall on the street parallel to Owli Street in the Borsa cafe area. 

uprisingsintranslation:

Nothing is sweeter than honor

Famous quote from the Egyptian film “Hassan, I Love You” (1958), said by actor Tawfik al Daqn (who is pictured here). This particular graffito is on Owli Street in downtown Cairo; the same graffito is on a wall on the street parallel to Owli Street in the Borsa cafe area

Egyptian protesters lift an obelisk with the names  of those killed during last year’s uprising, at a huge rally in Tahrir  Square on Jan. 25 marking the first anniversary of the uprising that  toppled president Hosni Mubarak as a debate raged over whether the rally  was a celebration or a second push for change. (Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty  Images)

Egyptian protesters lift an obelisk with the names of those killed during last year’s uprising, at a huge rally in Tahrir Square on Jan. 25 marking the first anniversary of the uprising that toppled president Hosni Mubarak as a debate raged over whether the rally was a celebration or a second push for change. (Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images)

Vigilante gangs of ultra-conservative Salafi men have been harassing shop owners and female customers in rural towns around Egypt for “indecent behavior,” according to reports in the Egyptian news media. But when they burst into a beauty salon in the Nile delta town of Benha this week and ordered the women inside to stop what they were doing or face physical punishment, the women struck back, whipping them with their own canes before kicking them out to the street in front of an astonished crowd of onlookers.
uprisingsintranslation:

PEOPLE DEMAND THE REMOVAL OF THE REGIME
I took this picture in downtown Cairo this past summer. “People demand the removal of the regime” is the English translation of one of the most popular chants of the Arab Spring. 
I believe the portraits in the middle of the wall (behind the tree) are of some of the martyrs of the revolution. To the right of the portraits is the quote “Heroes all… we must never forget.” I’ve seen a number of portraits of those killed in clashes during and since the January 25 uprising around Cairo. 

uprisingsintranslation:

PEOPLE DEMAND THE REMOVAL OF THE REGIME

I took this picture in downtown Cairo this past summer. “People demand the removal of the regime” is the English translation of one of the most popular chants of the Arab Spring. 

I believe the portraits in the middle of the wall (behind the tree) are of some of the martyrs of the revolution. To the right of the portraits is the quote “Heroes all… we must never forget.” I’ve seen a number of portraits of those killed in clashes during and since the January 25 uprising around Cairo. 

uprisingsintranslation:

freedom addict
(photo credit: Eric Knecht) 

uprisingsintranslation:

freedom addict

(photo credit: Eric Knecht) 

uprisingsintranslation:

Freedom for Alaa Abdel Fattah 
I took this photo a few months ago; this drawing of Alaa Abdel Fattah is on a wall on Mohammed Mahmoud Street. Alaa Abdel Fattah was released from jail on December 25. He was accused of inciting violence at the Maspero protests in October.
“We cannot just celebrate my innocence,” Alaa said during his release. “We know from the beginning I am not the one who killed people. We have not gone after the real criminals who killed people.” 

I cried tears of joy when Alaa Abdel Fattah was released, but we must remember Maikel Nabil and the thousands of others still imprisoned. When the news was announced half my timeline on Twitter sung Alaa over and over; a song of hope for the freedom of all political prisoners.

uprisingsintranslation:

Freedom for Alaa Abdel Fattah

I took this photo a few months ago; this drawing of Alaa Abdel Fattah is on a wall on Mohammed Mahmoud Street. Alaa Abdel Fattah was released from jail on December 25. He was accused of inciting violence at the Maspero protests in October.

“We cannot just celebrate my innocence,” Alaa said during his release. “We know from the beginning I am not the one who killed people. We have not gone after the real criminals who killed people.” 

I cried tears of joy when Alaa Abdel Fattah was released, but we must remember Maikel Nabil and the thousands of others still imprisoned. When the news was announced half my timeline on Twitter sung Alaa over and over; a song of hope for the freedom of all political prisoners.